Can A Therapist Recommend An Emotional Support Animal?

Like we have already explained above, only a licensed mental health professional can “prescribe” or recommend a valid emotional support animal letter.

If you’re already in therapy for a mental condition, great!

The best way to designate your pet as an ESA is to ask your therapist for an ESA letter.

Can a therapist prescribe an emotional support animal?

For a person to legally qualify for an emotional support animal (ESA), he/she must be considered emotionally disabled by a licensed mental health professional (therapist, psychologist, psychiatrist, etc.), as evidenced by a properly formatted prescription letter.

Do emotional support animals really help?

As all animals require their own care and attention, having an Emotional Support Animal can improve the symptoms of anxiety. By simply providing a distraction for the owner, an ESA can ward off the symptoms as they begin.

Would I benefit from an emotional support dog?

These benefits include calming and relaxing, lowering anxiety, alleviating loneliness, enhancing social engagement and interaction, normalizing heart rate and blood pressure, reducing pain, reducing stress, reducing depression and increasing pleasure.

How do you qualify for an emotional support animal?

If you have an emotional disability, you can legally qualify for an ESA, short for emotional support animal. You must be certified as emotionally disabled by a psychologist, therapist, psychiatrist or other duly-licensed and/or certified mental health professional.

Can a therapist write an ESA letter?

In order to get a valid emotional support animal letter, it needs to come from a licensed mental health professional. Licensed mental health professionals include psychiatrists, psychologists, licensed clinical social workers, psychiatric nurses, licensed professional counselors, and other licensed therapists.

Can a primary care physician write an ESA letter?

CAN MY PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN WRITE ME AN ESA PRESCRIPTION? No, you must have a letter written by a mental health professional who holds a license: LCSW, PsyD, PhD or LMFT.