Question: Are Emotional Support Animals?

Emotional support animals (ESAs) refer to dogs and other pets that provide emotional support and comfort to their owners on a daily basis.

Individuals with ESAs are afforded some additional rights, such as the ability to live in otherwise non-pet-friendly housing under the Fair Housing Act.

Are emotional support animals Service animals?

Emotional support animals, comfort animals, and therapy dogs are not service animals under Title II and Title III of the ADA. Other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not considered service animals either. A doctor’s letter does not turn an animal into a service animal.

What animals can be emotional support animals?

Emotional Support Animals include dogs, cats, horses, rabbits, ferrets, birds, monkeys, bearded dragons, and pigs, etc. Federal law does not require these animals to have any specific training.

Can my landlord charge me for an emotional support animal?

Landlords cannot legally:

Ask a tenant to pay a deposit, fee, or surcharge in exchange for having an emotional support animal, even if they require such a practice from owners who wish to obtain pets in their dwelling. Require that an emotional support animal have any specific training.

What disabilities qualify for an emotional support animal?

Here is a list of general emotional/mental challenges and impairments that can be helped by an ESA:

  • Age-Related Cognitive Decline.
  • Anxiety.
  • Any Psychiatric Condition.
  • Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD or ADHD)
  • Autism.
  • Bipolar Disorder.
  • Depression.
  • Dyslexia.